Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Equal Pay New York City Bars Questions Around Wage History

Equivalent Pay New York City Bars Questions Around Wage History Beginning one month from now, New York City offices will not, at this point have the option to get some information about their compensation history. Chairman Bill de Blasio marked an official request on Friday that squares city offices from getting some information about a candidate's past pay before expanding a proposition for employment. Backers contend that one unfair compensation choice leads definitely to the following and makes a pattern of lower profit all through a profession. It's basic to the achievement of our organizations and our city all in all that everybody is dealt withâ€"and paidâ€"with the decency and regard they merit, the chairman said in an announcement. Peruse straightaway: How Banning Employers from Asking About Salary History Could Help Close the Wage Gap The nation over, ladies despite everything make generally 80 ¢ for each dollar earned by their male partners. In New York City alone, ladies who are utilized full-time lose more than $23 billion every year to the pay hole, as per the National Partnership for Women. What's more, however the hole is narrowing, progress has been moderate. Friday's official request influences around 300,000 city laborers, a larger part of whom are unionized and are paid dependent on terms built up through aggregate dealing understandings. So the new guidelines will principally influence those being considered for administrative jobs, which make up about 10% of the city's workforce. Official Order 21 is set to go live in 30 days. Ladies keep on confronting separation in the employment form process and in compensation arrangements. This official request will systematize city offices' promise to offering pay rates to planned representatives dependent on merit, not sex, said Azadeh Khalili, official chief of the Mayor's Commission on Gender Equity. New York City's drive follows the path bursted by the compensation value law authorized by Massachusetts this mid year. The state was the first to put administers on the books blocking nearby bosses from getting some information about pay history before extending to candidates an employment opportunity. Peruse straightaway: Even the Top-Paying Profession for Women Has a Huge Wage Gap Massachusetts state congressperson Patricia Jehlen cosponsored the enactment that Gov. Charlie Baker marked into law in August. The law, which produces results in July 2018, additionally offers motivating forces for organizations to handle sexual orientation pay lopsided characteristics and gives more clear norms to ensuring that laborers get practically identical compensation for tantamount work. To genuinely accomplish equivalent compensation, society needs to at long last worth customarily ladies' work suitably, Jehlen says. We will accomplish equivalent compensation when we quit underestimating ladies' commitments and begin esteeming that work. New York City might be the first of a few urban areas and states to recreate Massachusetts' exertion. Jehlen takes note of that administrators from Illinois, North Carolina, Washington, D.C., and Texas have just connected with her office. In the mean time, D.C. Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton presented the Pay Equity for All Act in the U.S. Congress in September. Whenever passed, it would banish managers across the country from getting some information about past pay rates. Khalili is confident different U.S. urban communities will observe New York's model. At the point when New York moves, a great deal of different urban communities move. So we think this will be have a major effect on a nearby level around the nation, she says.

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Not the Perfect Candidate Heres What to Do - Workology

Not the Perfect Candidate Here’s What to Do - Workology Not the Perfect Candidate? Here’s What to Do Several times a month we feature a blog post from our our on sister website, Secrets of the Job Hunt.  Click here  to view.   A recent article in the  New York Times  detailed  the reality for many job candidates  in today’s market. Companies often have the luxury to wait for the perfect hire, and even applicants who seem to match every requirement for the position aren’t receiving employment offers. What does that mean for those of us who  aren’t  the perfect candidate? What if you’re a good candidate who’s unfortunately missing that extra year or two of experience every employer is asking for? Not the Perfect Candidate? Here’s What to Do Well, it doesn’t necessarily mean you must move on to the next opportunity. But you do need to work harder to show hiring managers you’re right for the job. Here’s how: Make sure you’re in the ballpark.  If the position requires knowledge of  GAAP, and you have to consult Wikipedia for a definition, don’t waste your time. There’s no point in applying for a job if you don’t meet the most basic criteria. Consider how you can fill the gaps.  Say the company you’re applying to expects candidates to have two years of management experience. Highlighting the time you spent overseeing a previous employer’s internship program, as well as leadership roles you’ve held on a handful of project teams, could be enough to get your foot in the door. Remember that honesty is the best policy.  If you’re tempted to stretch the truth to make up for gaps in your qualifications, I strongly urge you not to. No matter how minor the lie or how seemingly remote the possibility it will be uncovered, the employer may still find out. This is especially true today because of the Internet and social media. Keep in mind that a lie of any type can do irreparable harm to your reputation, even years down the road. Address the elephant in the room.  Use your  cover letter  to shed light on any issues that could come up with your qualifications. If you lack the required educational degree, for instance, you might explain why you feel your on-the-job experience makes up for it. By being upfront, you may prevent a potential concern from derailing your application at this early stage. Enlist inside assistance.  The best way to convince a  hiring manager  you have what it takes to do the job? Find someone who can back up what you say. Scan  your professional network  for people who may have a connection to your target company and consider asking if they’d be comfortable providing a referral. Make things easy for them by explaining why you think you’re right for the position. As helpful as a referral can be, you still need to be selective about the people you approach. You should have an established relationship with anyone you target so he or she can speak knowledgeably about your background. Above all, remember what I said at the beginning: Many companies can afford to be picky. Despite your best efforts, some employers may simply refuse to consider you for the job if you don’t meet every single requirement. If that’s the case, know you did everything you could to put yourself in the running for the role and keep an eye out for the opportunity you truly are perfect for. Have you ever applied for a job when you lack all the qualifications? What did you do to convince a hiring manager you were still right for the role?

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Resume Writing Desk Services

Resume Writing Desk ServicesIf you're looking for a job, getting it done from a resume writing desk can be very helpful. It can help you out in a variety of ways, such as being able to brainstorm, generating ideas for your resume, and telling you what to do with the information that you get. Plus, you can get a lot of feedback that will help you find a job.There are many great places where you can find a professional resume writer, such as online. You can also ask around at work if you are looking for one. They should be available to you no matter what you need them for. But if you want to go straight to them, here are some things to look for when checking them out.They will want to know what you want from them. They will have to tell you what kind of experience they are capable of providing you with. For example, some are good at writing resumes for medical professionals. They can tailor a resume to fit a doctor's case. If you want to specialize in some other field, it might be some thing that you need help with, which is fine.They should be able to tell you what kind of job search advice they can give you, whether or not they are capable of giving you this advice. There are many places online where you can get this advice, but many people don't take advantage of it. Just make sure you know how much they can give you.They should be capable of giving you contact information so you can get in touch with them easily. This way you won't have to waste time asking your friends and family members for information. They should be able to provide you with a phone number, email address, and even a physical address, if necessary.They should be able to provide you with feedback on what they see you doing right and wrong. They should be able to provide you with good and bad feedback and tell you what to change and what to leave alone. If you have negative feedback, this is a good indicator that there is something that needs changing, and if you have good feedback, you can us e it to your advantage.If you are going to get a professional resume written for you, this is what you should expect. There are many places online that offer these services, but you need to choose the one that offers the best return for your money. If you don't know how to narrow down your choices, it's better to stick with a few options than to look for an agency that you won't be satisfied with.Resume writing desk services should be fully staffed and should be able to have any job you request. Just because you are looking for help doesn't mean that you have to go to them first.

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Questions to Ask the Interviewer about Job Security COVID-19 Safety

Questions to Ask the Interviewer about Job Security COVID-19 Safety ShareShare I recently did some interview coaching with a client who was interviewing for a role that involved managing an annual fundraising event. The event was coming up in summer of 2020. Of course she was concerned and wondered What happens to the role if the event is canceled? My advice was: Dont be afraid to ask that question at the interview. The following is a list of questions you can ask to assess how secure a position might be. Of course there is no crystal ball here. All you can do is ask good questions and then make an informed decision if you succeed in getting the offer. Remember, a good question to ask is one that is: Appropriate for the role, company, industry and situation. Asked with a positive, collaborative tone, with empathy for the interviewer. They may be just as stressed as you are. Asked at the right time. Focus first on the needs of the role, and save direct questions about recession and COVID-19 until later in the interview process. Open-ended, if you want more information than just yes or no. Open-ended questions start with words like what, how, who, when or where. Informed by your pre-interview research into the company and the industry. Before asking any question, imagine the interviewer turning it back on you: What do you think? Thinking this through is a useful exercise to help prepare yourself for the discussion. Questions to ask in a job interview during a recession: What is the companys strategy for success during this crisis/pandemic/recession? How is the company planning for long-term changes that will occur in the industry over the next five years or so? What is your strategy to keep your department strong and maintain FTE? How does upper management view the importance of this department? Of this role? Its difficult to get funding to hire these days. What is the need driving this hire? Why is this role viewed as essential? Is this a new role? If so, when was the decision made to create this role? What types of skills do you not have on the team, that youre hoping to bring in with this hire? What is the highest priority for this role in the next six months? And after that? How will the current situation created special challenges for this role? And if the indirect approach doesnt do it, try a very general question: What can you tell me about job security in this role? Questions to ask the interviewer about COVID-19: Will this position be remote at this point? What about in future? How will the assessment be made that its safe to work onsite again? What safety procedures have you put in place to protect workers? If an employee shows signs of COVID-19 infection and/or tests positive, how will everyones safety be protected? Whats your COVID-19 sick leave policy? Whats your policy about employees staying home to care for a sick family member? What expense reimbursements are provided for employees working from home? Job security is never a yes/no proposition in the best of times. During a pandemic and a recession, most jobs are on a continuum somewhere between relatively secure and not at all secure, but asking questions like these in your interviews can help you make educated guesses for decision-making purposes. And if you get the job? Celebrate, make a flawless transition into your new job, track your accomplishments, keep your resume updated, manage your career, expect the unexpectedand dont forget to smell the roses along the way. Questions to Ask the Interviewer about Job Security COVID-19 Safety ShareShare I recently did some interview coaching with a client who was interviewing for a role that involved managing an annual fundraising event. The event was coming up in summer of 2020. Of course she was concerned and wondered What happens to the role if the event is canceled? My advice was: Dont be afraid to ask that question at the interview. The following is a list of questions you can ask to assess how secure a position might be. Of course there is no crystal ball here. All you can do is ask good questions and then make an informed decision if you succeed in getting the offer. Remember, a good question to ask is one that is: Appropriate for the role, company, industry and situation. Asked with a positive, collaborative tone, with empathy for the interviewer. They may be just as stressed as you are. Asked at the right time. Focus first on the needs of the role, and save direct questions about recession and COVID-19 until later in the interview process. Open-ended, if you want more information than just yes or no. Open-ended questions start with words like what, how, who, when or where. Informed by your pre-interview research into the company and the industry. Before asking any question, imagine the interviewer turning it back on you: What do you think? Thinking this through is a useful exercise to help prepare yourself for the discussion. Questions to ask in a job interview during a recession: What is the companys strategy for success during this crisis/pandemic/recession? How is the company planning for long-term changes that will occur in the industry over the next five years or so? What is your strategy to keep your department strong and maintain FTE? How does upper management view the importance of this department? Of this role? Its difficult to get funding to hire these days. What is the need driving this hire? Why is this role viewed as essential? Is this a new role? If so, when was the decision made to create this role? What types of skills do you not have on the team, that youre hoping to bring in with this hire? What is the highest priority for this role in the next six months? And after that? How will the current situation created special challenges for this role? And if the indirect approach doesnt do it, try a very general question: What can you tell me about job security in this role? Questions to ask the interviewer about COVID-19: Will this position be remote at this point? What about in future? How will the assessment be made that its safe to work onsite again? What safety procedures have you put in place to protect workers? If an employee shows signs of COVID-19 infection and/or tests positive, how will everyones safety be protected? Whats your COVID-19 sick leave policy? Whats your policy about employees staying home to care for a sick family member? What expense reimbursements are provided for employees working from home? Job security is never a yes/no proposition in the best of times. During a pandemic and a recession, most jobs are on a continuum somewhere between relatively secure and not at all secure, but asking questions like these in your interviews can help you make educated guesses for decision-making purposes. And if you get the job? Celebrate, make a flawless transition into your new job, track your accomplishments, keep your resume updated, manage your career, expect the unexpectedand dont forget to smell the roses along the way.

Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Featured Job CRM Architect @ Hilton Worldwide - Copeland Coaching

Featured Job CRM Architect @ Hilton Worldwide Another company with an amazing history, Hilton has been a leader in the hospitality industry for over 96 years. Hilton Worldwide consists of 12 brands, 4,440 properties, and 155,000 team members. From luxurious full-service resorts to extended-stay and mid-priced hotels, Hilton has become a welcome home away from home for travelers all across the globe. If youre passionate about global travel and improving the way companies listen and respond to customer needs, this could be the perfect career opportunity for you.  The CRM Architect will work closely with the project development teams and project support teams to ensure the right architecture is implemented across multiple work streams. The Team Member will develop standards (data definition, tools, and platforms) related to CRM architecture, marketing solutions, and customer engagement systems. This position is based in Memphis, TN. To learn more, or to apply online, visit the Hilton website here.

Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Customize this Outstanding Manager Is Risk And Compliance Resume Sample

Redo this Outstanding Manager Is Risk And Compliance Resume Sample Redo this Outstanding Manager Is Risk And Compliance Resume Sample Make Resume Nelson Yondle100 Broadway LaneNew Parkland, CA, 91010Cell: (555) 987-1234example-email@example.comProfessional SummaryComprehensive Manager IS Risk and Compliance with PCI DSS experience and SOX IS conventions. Demonstrated history of imaginative and successful consistence reviews, keeping up legitimate degrees of system wellbeing and building up practical hazard assessment models. Spends significant time in the formation of consistence sway examination and wide hazard evaluation programs.Core QualificationsPCI Security CertifiedDSS ExpertLicensed Network Security TechnicianSOX ExperienceRisk Management Certified ProfessionalLegacy Network ExpertExperienceManager IS Risk and Compliance, September 2010 PresentKahle Insurance New Cityland, CACollects and audits month to month organize security appraisals with IT director.Maintains a powerful log of all PCI DSS activity.Personally prepares all new hazard and consistence specialists that are hired.Manager IS Risk and Complian ce, June 1994 December 2004Green Insurance New Cityland, CAWrote a quarterly appraisal of new IT innovation that was submitted to official team.Regularly performed arrange security fixes and updates.Maintained the honesty of all PCI DSS systems.Education1994 Bachelor of Science, Network EngineeringBase College New Cityland, CACustomize Resume

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Getting Hired as an Executive Is a Different Game

Getting Hired as an Executive Is a “Different Game” “It’s a very broken system at the senior management level as far as I’m concerned.”Even amidst the frenzied gossiping of local college girls and honking traffic of Northwest Washington DC, the calm demeanor of George Zarubin couldn’t hide the frustration. It was lunchtime at a local Mexican restaurant as we sat down to talk about his 7 month process of finding a new executive position at a nonprofit. Zarubin and I had spoken before about what it was like working with recruitment organizations (often called headhunters at this level), but I had no idea about the process of being hired to run something like a foundation.Having recently run the $400 million endowment of The America for Bulgaria Foundation and now working as the Executive Director of The AHA Foundation, Zarubin has built a career running internationally focused non-profits around the world. He’s not the type of person who would need to spend too much time finding a job. And yet, despite the fact that an entir e industry of headhunting companies exist to hire people like Zarubin for these positions, he sees that process as deeply flawed.The executive hiring game has more players“When you see the job… you’re not referred directly to the company, you’re referred to the headhunters. And the headhunters don’t really want to be looking through a bunch of resumes that have been sent to them.”One of the first things that becomes clear listening to Zarubin is the number of players involved in executive hiring. You have the three basic players: you, the headhunters, and the company you’re trying to get hired by. But actually, the latter two can be much more complex.“The system is even more broken because usually it’s a board that’s hiring a [headhunting] firm, and the board compromises and agrees on a job description, tells the [headhunters] what they want, and the [headhunter] doesn’t want to go outside those boundaries… And usually, any kind of criteria that’s set by co mpromise is imperfect in itself… usually looking for somebody you’re not going to find.”But the problems ultimately go beyond that culture of compromise.Related articles:How job sharing can change the future of workWhat recruiters look for in a resume at a first glanceHow to identify and embed your company culture to grow your businessHeadhunters are all about networks“At the senior level, either you’re in the network or you’re not, you either know the recruiter or you don’t… [but] they’re not interested in getting to know you… It’s a fascinating study in imperfect supply and demand. There’s no real good mechanism that links the one with the other.”Zarubin explained that in this sense, headhunting firms are very conservative in how they handle their networks. Because they only tend to hire from within those networks, there’s plenty of “supply” in the form of good candidates who simply aren’t considered. Incredibly, the issue of restrictive networks doesn’t just exist for headhunting firms as a whole, it also exists within those firms.“[The big headhunting firms] may not even be sharing information within their own networks, among their own colleagues, and across offices. So the London partner might not know what the Washington partner knows in terms of a person who might be suitable for a placement.”The result is that it’s up to those getting hired as well as people working within the headhunting firms to tackle the system.“You have to break that cycle… And I bet certain [headhunters], if they’re honest, would love to be able to break into all their other colleagues networks and see who it is they have.”But even if there’s nothing Zarubin can do to affect how headhunters operate, there are steps he’s learned to take to be more effective within this entire process.Proactivity is key to getting hired as an executiveZarubin obviously had a lot to say about the system he’s witnessed and worked within for most of his professional career, but I was also interested in discussing what lessons he’s learned along the way. Those lessons start with being proactive.“When I see something on LinkedIn and I see it on a platform of a recruiter, then I try to figure out if I know any of those recruiters. I actually call them to alert them to the fact that I’m sending my resume in. You have to be incredibly proactive, a lot more so than you would think.”So just because there was a headhunting firm working to find a new executive director for the AHA foundation didn’t mean Zarubin could wait to be found and approached about the position. He had to take the first steps.Getting hired for positions that are never announced“Most senior management jobs, like president or CEO… never get announced. They’re all done in secret. Both of my last two senior executive, non-profit positions identified me through my networks and these positions were for jobs that were not posted anywhere.”Getting hi red for such a job might seem daunting, but Zarubin has a clear strategy which has worked for him.“At some point, I just sent out a message to a whole bunch of the [headhunters] I was talking to saying ‘I know sometimes you have jobs that aren’t externally posted. If anything looks like it has a bit of an international flair and suits my qualifications, let me know.’ Next thing I know, I get a call saying ‘would you consider this non-profit job?’ I wrote back and said ‘it sounds very intriguing, tell me more.’ That started a process I would never have gotten into had I not already been in the recruiting process, meeting these recruiters… continuing to write to them, keeping my foot in the door and saying ‘I’m here and I’m looking’.”Once again, it boils down to building relationships with recruiters and always being proactive. However, Zarubin also cautions that this doesn’t mean you can neglect building and maintaining relationships with board members e ither.“There are times when a board can become frustrated with a search process and begin reaching out themselves. That’s where having those relationships can really make a difference.”Ultimately, Zarubin’s reflection on the entire process was straightforward.“It’s a very very complicated, imperfect, and competitive process… at the senior, non-profit and international development management level it seems to be a very different game. But, it’s also extremely rewarding when you find the right fit.”